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Months 31-33

Months 31-33

Mental Development

  • Play make-believe with common objects from around the house
  • Hold a conversation of two or three sentences
  • Be able to express their needs and wants verbally
  • Identify a friend by naming them
  • Be able to concentrate on a task for a short period of time
  • Know size differences and be able to select the “big” ball or the “little” ball
  • Understand basic cause-and-effect relationships
  • Refer to themselves using the word “I”

Visual Development

  • Identify a square or circle

Growth

31 Months

  • Weigh about 12.9 kg if she’s a girl or about 13.5 kg if he’s a boy
  • Be about 91.4 cm tall if she’s a girl or about 92.7 cm tall if he’s a boy

32 Months

  • Weigh about 13.1 kg if she’s a girl or about 13.7 kg if he’s a boy
  • Be about 92.2 cm tall if she’s a girl or about 93.4 cm tall if he’s a boy

33 Months

  • Weigh about 13.3 kg if she’s a girl or about 13.8 kg if he’s a boy
  • Be about 92.9 cm tall if she’s a girl or about 94.1 cm tall if he’s a boy

 

Motor Development

  • Like to make music with real or homemade instruments
  • Start to lift their pencil or crayon off the paper at regular intervals to do pretend “writing”
  • Be able to kick a ball a short distance
  • Be getting better at throwing a ball well over arm
  • Be able to wrap up objects
  • Balance on each foot for one second
  • Be able to mix ingredients and do other simple food preparation tasks with supervision

Social and Emotional Development

  • Need to try both options before choosing one when making a decision
  • Be likely to have a temper tantrum if “forced” into a course of behaviour
  • Likely to be more cooperative if they learn that you are going to be firm with them
  • Use language to try to get their own way
  • Learn how to get along with others
  • Prefer a predictable routine related to sleeping, eating and other basic activities
  • Learn how to share possessions with others
  • Mimic adult behaviour when asked to show feelings such as anger or happiness
  • Have an imaginary friend

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